About your Search

20121201
20121231
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17
on the bridges in connecticut to make this system to attract the ridership that we need to make that, those cost savings and that calculation work. >> i guess what i'm referring to also is the fact that the $4 billion in revenue that is projected, that's just one number, one benefit, one source. it's certainly far from what we should be talking about obvious. everybody knows that, but the more you can give us, the more you can parse this, different angles you might take. i'm sure it's all going to be helpful. >> and we will absolutely do that with amtrak and our partners at the u.s. dot. >> thank you. my time is up. >> any further questions from any members of the committee? seeing none, i'd like to thank each of our witnesses for your testimony today. i ask unanimous consent at the record of today's agreement open until such time as our witnesses have provided answers to any questions that have been submitted to them in writing. and unanimous consent the record remain open for 15 days for additional comments and information submitted by members for which it is to be included in the record of to
of connecticut to be united states district judge. the presiding officer: the senator from vermont is recognized. mr. leahy: madam president, the senate is finally being allowed to vote today on the nomination of michael shea to be a district judge in the united states district court for district -- the district of connecticut. it has taken a long time for this day to come but he will be confirmed, and i congratulate him and his family on his confirmation and i congratulate the two senators from connecticut for finally having this come to a vote. i mention this not to urge that we confirm him because we will and i will very proudly vote for him, but michael shea is another nominee whose nomination was stalled for months for no good reason. the judiciary committee and the distinguished presiding officer serves on that committee will call we gave his nomination strong bipartisan support, more than seven months ago. he has the support of both home state senators, both senator lieberman and senator blumenthal. he has significant litigation experience. he is a graduate of yale law school. he clerked
. and then a discussion on the school shootings in newtown, connecticut. later, we will re-air gary locke on the relationship between the two countries, china and the united states. tomorrow morning, a form on the consumer credit report. and oversight of the credit reporting market. the that live at c-span3 at 10 eastern senator daniel inouyebie died yesterday at the age of 88. this is a little bit more than a half-hour. >> is he was a colleague but really a friend. he helped me so many times, helped me do my best here, my best has been with the help of him. as i mentioned briefly yesterday, he always had so much confidence in me. years ago, years ago when i was a senator struggling, like all senators here, he told me two decades ago that i would be running the senate someday. i never even contemplated, thought about that, desired that. things have worked out that he was right. senator inouye is one of the amerir inouye is one of the >> senator inouye, he is one of the finest men i have ever known. a real americano hero. my friend, who is on the floor, the system leader, has told hiss sto
jersey but also connecticut and not just in this disaster, but also going back to 2011 and the catastrophe the connecticut suffered, three of them in that period of time when you personally contacted me and offered assistance. so i want the people of connecticut to know they have real friend in the senator from louisiana and your leadership has been really tremendous in this area. thank you to senator vitter as well. i want to just briefly say thank you to the president for providing the strong leadership he has in the -- wake of disasterrer in the connecticut. he promptly declared connecticut an emergency area and that permitted the sba to come forward along with fema and i want to thank the folks who came from sba, the people on the ground who have been there for quite some time now. .. >> i think you need to know that the connecticut office has already approved about 7 million in disaster assistance for struggling businesses in connecticut, as well as residents. that figure is significant. there are a large number of requests for funding that are still being processe
. lieberman: mr. president? the presiding officer: the senator from connecticut is recognized. mr. lieberman: i ask further proceedings under the quorum call be dispensed with. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. lieberman: i thank the chair. mr. president, my fourth and final term as united states senator will soon come to an end. as i reflect on that reality, i am of course filled with many emotions, but the one that i feel most is gratitude. gratitude first to god, creator of life and law, whose -- without whose loving kindness nothing would be possible. gratitude to america, this extraordinary land of opportunity which has given someone like me so many opportunities. gratitude to the people of connecticut who have entrusted me with the privilege of public service for 40 years, the last 24 in the united states senate. gratitude to my senate colleagues whom i've come to know as friends and with whom it has been such an honor to serve. gratitude to all the people without whose help, hard work and support i never would have made it to the senate or stayed here. the gifted and hardw
of the horrific shooting in newtown, connecticut, on friday, it was impossible for me not to react not just as a senator, but as a parent, as a father. and as my wife and i spent the weekend reflecting on the heartbreaks loss of 20 innocent children and 6 of their teachers and faculty, as we talked to our own three young children about what had happened, we thought about the grief, the anguish. a whole range of different parents deeply touched by this tragic incident. the first, of course, are the parents who lost their precious, innocent children. their six- and seven-year olds in the massacre at sandy hook elementary school last friday. parents like joel and joann baker who lost their precocious outgoing red-haired daughter charlotte just six years old. joann recently bought charlotte a holiday dress in her favorite color -- pink -- and a pair of white boots. charlotte begged and begged to wear her new outfit early and on friday, december 14, the last day of charlotte's young life, her mother joann agreed. or parents like steve and rebecca kowalski, who lost their son chase. two days befo
yield the floor. the presiding officer: the senator from connecticut. mr. blumenthal: thank you, mr. president. i want to join in thank the chairman of the armed services committee, senator levin, and the distinguished ranking member, senator mccain, for the extraordinary bipartisan work they have done on this measure and also the accommodation and consideration they've given to all of us who have proposed amendments, as well as to their staff, and the majority leader. it has been an extraordinary work for the national defense and national security of our nation, and on behalf of connecticut, which produces many of the key products involved in this bill -- the joint strike fighter, our submarines, the sikorsky helicopter -- we have a great deal of pride in the support that the united states senate has given today to our national defense and the production of such great products, as we do in connecticut. i'm going to ask now unanimous consent that the agriculture, nutrition, and forestry committee be discharged from further consideration of s. 1947 and that the senate proceed to its
. gratitude to the people of connecticut who have entrusted me with the privilege of public service for 40 years. the last 24 in the united states senate. gratitude to my senate colleagues i've come to know as friends and with whom it has been such an honor to serve. gratitude to all the people without whose help, hard work and support i never would have made it to the senate or stayed here. the gifted and hard-working staff in connecticut and washington who supported and informed and enriched my service here, and the volunteers in my campaigns who gave so much and asked for nothing in return except that i do what i believed was right. gratitude to all those who labor out of view in the corridors of this capitol building, from the maintenance crews to the capitol police and everybody else anywhere in this building. thank you for keeping our capitol running and keeping us safe. gratitude most of all, of course, to my family for the love, support, and inspiration they've given me every day of my life. my parents, grandparents, and siblings, my children and grandchildren, and hadosa, my wife
from connecticut would like to speak for five minutes. and i was hoping that we could get some time where we could go back and forth and talk about the magnitsky aspects of that legislation now. am i correct, mr. president, the bill has not yet been -- going to be reported now? perhaps we could enter into a consent as to the next 30 or 40 minutes. the presiding officer: morning business is closed. under the previous order the senate will proceed to consideration of h.r. 6156, which the clerk will report. the clerk: calendar number -- mr. mccain: mr. president, i ask unanimous consent further reading be dispensed with. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. mccain: mr. president, i also note note the presence of our friend, senator lieberman on the floor, who also has had a major role in this legislation. and i would hope that perhaps he could be -- i ask unanimous consent he be included in the colloquy. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. mccain: again, could i ask my friend, senator cardin, i have a statement that i wanted to make before the colloquy, and i know yo
senator from connecticut, my dear friend, senator joe lieberman. when joe lieberman announced early last year that he would not seek reelection to the senate, he called himself a lucky guy for having had the opportunity to serve his state and his country. i would contend that it is we in this chamber and the people throughout connecticut and across our nation who are the ones who are truly fortunate, for joe lieberman's life long commitment to public service, including his 24 years here in the senate. for more than a decade it has been my privilege to serve with joe as the leaders of the senate homeland security and governmental affairs committee. regardless of who has been chairman and who has been ranking member, ours has been a partnership. and indeed, mr. president, i'll never forget when i was losing the chairmanship because of the change in control, joe leaning over to me and saying "don't worry, susan. all that will change is that you'll pass me the gavel." it was typical of his thoughtfulness and generosity. and it is not coincidental, mr. president, that ours is the only committ
changed as well. it's my understanding the state of connecticut had the type of gun laws that have been proposed and they didn't work. at the end of the day it's an individual person, it's a people problem. and changing laws doesn't necessarily change hearts. it is a cultural problem as well. that's why i don't think we need to change these laws but we need to look at an issue of society where violence has become acceptable in many avenues and simply need to turn on the television many nights to see that. the first question was about the top 2% and class warfare and what is going on. but clearly 70% of americans take more from washington than they give. here we are as republicans upsets me that with the vote today and with the offer of speaker john boehner we've given into what the president has agreed. we have to go after the so-called rich. but as i indicated earlier, 41% of small business income is going to be taxed at a higher rate. and so this is just not the warren buffetts of the world. this is actually entrepreneurs that are actually paying income taxes on -- it stays in their b
that's what we need for the country to move ahead. host: steven an independent in connecticut. good morning to you. caller: good morning, thanks for taking my call. i really like hillary clinton, i think she's a hard worker, i think her old man is a hard worker too and whitewater was like three wars ago. it's a long time ago. but i'd like to see jeb bush also run against hillary clinton. i think those are two no nonsense personalities that can move our nation forward. thanks. host: so hey, steven, if jeb bush, if it's a bush-clinton race, for whom would you vote? caller: oh, gosh. i would lean toward jeb at this point because he has been really pushing education and education is one of my things. so right now he's got me. host: that's stephen, independent. who did you vote for in 2008? i mean in 2012. it's 2012 now. caller: i voted for president obama and i really, really liked mitt romney. i thought he had a great personality but you know, why do i got to pay less taxes than my friend from massachusetts? so that really bugged me. host: stephen an independent in connecticut. tyrone
, connecticut, many wonder what do they have in common? gun tragedy, the loss of 26 lives, and americans suffering from a devastating storm, certainly our hearts goes out to those babies who were lost. but it really speaks to americans in need, and i guess that's why i'm so troubled to be on the floor today, because the framework that we have says to america that when you're in need we will not as this congress and this government be prepared to help you. i think what is disappointing and i know for the speaker, it is probably the same case as i am speaking because just about three days ago we thought there was a deal between the white house and the framework that was offered and the leadership of this house. it's disappointing that in the course of a couple days we've come to a situation where this plan, plan b, raises only about $300 billion from high-income households and the centers for budget priorities suggest that millionaires will get $108,500 per $1 million, over $1 million in tax cuts, but what will the middle class gets? plan b allows the old pre-bush or bush tax cuts to conti
us on the democratic line from connecticut. caller: good morning. my question is, in watching c- span over the years, i noticed there was once an episode where an economist talked-about a world view on reducing the imprint of the military and using limited black ops and to intervene in situations to quell unrest in the discos along with the things like the economy -- this goes along with things like the economy. my question is how do you see us going black ops and the cia? is this not what we did in afghanistan? guest: i understand there is a very wrong perception among the public that all special ops do are black ops and unilateral raids in the dead of night. that perception is widely held. in the case of columbia, the philippines, yemen, these other places that i am talking about, the governments have invited special operations forces in to help them, to help their country's forces. that is why i think it is such an effective use in the long term. it does not cause the same political diplomatic controversy as many people know what happened after the bin laden rate. it was a huge rup
like a small town that's through the magic of federalism and the connecticut compromise and the continental congress, a state with two senators. one of the things i'm proudest of about our state -- senator carper knows this well -- is a tradition that just celebrated its 200th anniversary, the epitome of what we call the delaware way. it's a tradition that happens two days after every election. it's called return day, and it happens in georgetown, which is the county seat of our southern most county, sussex county. what happens two days after the election, the first thing that happens is we gather out at a farm and two by two, the candidates who ran against each other in the general election get into horse-drawn carriages and ride slowly down the main streets of georgetown where crowds of thousands come out to see the candidates who just days before were engaged in vigorous political combat being polite, being friendly and waving to the crowds. what happens after that, senator carper? mr. carper: we have this beautiful center of town in george, beautiful old brick buildi
as a -- after the tragedy in connecticut. and it costs money to get the facilities hardened, to get the personnel that are needed. so i -- ambassador stevens was a proud californian. there's a hole in all of our hearts. i'm going to get to my questions. um, and i guess aisle going to ask it straight out. do you plan in the next budget to request the funding levels that are necessary for protecting all of our facilities? >> um, the answer to that is, yes, senator. i am, i am, although, aware -- as we all are -- in the con statements in which we are living. to remind the committee, as you all are well aware, for everything we do at the state department, and that includes protecting over 275 locations around the world, for all of the assistance we provide including assistance to israel, all of our programs including pep far, everything we do at the state department, as secretary clinton has articulated many times, is less than 1% of our federal budget -- >> so my question is, are you going the submit to us a plan and the money request that you believe you need absolutely paying attenti
, the gentleman from connecticut, longstanding authority on the subject of election reform in terms of the role of money in campaigns -- honoring the vows of our founders for a government of the many, not the government of the money and a person who has commanded the respect of our colleagues, has worked with aggressive organizations, brings real authority to the stuff, congressman john larson, chair of our taskforce. >> thank you, madam leader, and i thank you for the opportunity to serve our caucus in an area that is critical to all americans. we are just through major presidential and congressional elections. it is clear from listening to our colleagues and from listening to the people out there in this country that it is long overdue that we refer to as d.a.r.e., which, disclose, amend, reform, enforce, empower, and have reform for election in a way that will make sure that every american has access to the polls and that anyone who seeks to run for public office has the ability and financing to do so and that we can limit the amount of money that has so overshadowed our process. to those en
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17